Research Associates & Postdoctoral Fellows

Research Associates & Postdoctoral Fellows:

  • Dr. Daniele Chirico
  • Dr. Heather Clark
  • Dr. Jeffrey Graham
  • Dr. Kalpana Nair
  • Dr. Lisa Rivard

 

Research Associates & Postdoctoral Fellows

 

Dr. Daniele Chirico is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University. He completed his PhD in Health Biosciences at Brock University, with a focus on pediatric cardiovascular physiology. His research examined the impact of growth and maturation on cardiovascular development with specializations in blood pressure regulation (baroreflex function), and arterial stiffness. Daniele’s current research interests include examining the impact of childhood disabilities and early exposure to risk factors on cardiovascular development, as well as examining the relationship between cerebral blood flow regulation and neuropsychological development in children and adolescents.

 

 


 

Dr. Jeffrey Graham is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University. He completed a PhD in Exercise and Health Psychology at McMaster University in the Department of Kinesiology. His research focused on understanding how self-control, self-regulation, and social-cognitive factors modify the performance of physical exercise. His current research is examining the impact of physical activity on executive functioning and self-regulation in children with and without neurodevelopmental disorders.

 

 


 

Dr. Heather Clark is a Research Associate in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University. She completed her PhD in psychology with a focus on understanding developmental cascades of parenting behaviours, self-regulation, and early antisocial behaviour. Her research interests are in understanding how factors such as self-regulation interact with contextual factors (e.g., family relationships) to result in both risk and resilience. She is currently working on the Developmental Screening project.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Dr. Kalpana Nair is a Research Associate in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University and joined INCH in 2014. She completed a PhD in Health Research Methodology from McMaster University that focussed on understanding interdisciplinarity in health research teams. Kalpana has worked in health research for over 15 years on a variety of studies and projects related to chronic disease management; the patient perspective; and older adults. Methodologically, Kalpana has expertise and interests in qualitative research methods, program evaluation, and implementation science. Kalpana is currently working on a project related to the development of a toolkit for early identification of potential delay in infants and children. This toolkit will eventually be utilized by early childhood educators and staff in settings where there is regular contact with families with infants and young children.

 

 

 

 

 


Dr. Lisa Rivard is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University and joined the INCH Lab in 2015. Lisa completed her PhD in the School of Rehabilitation Science at McMaster University, where her work centred on advancing knowledge of the motor function of children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Using an innovative eye tracking method, her doctoral research examined the role of selective visual attention during motor performance in school-aged children with DCD. A physiotherapist for 25 years, Lisa has been involved in clinical, research, and educational activities related to child development, health, and disability, with a particular passion for understanding children with DCD. Her current research interests include using eye tracking to study the effectiveness of attentional cueing within cognitive interventions for children with DCD, examination of the measurement properties of clinical tools used with this population, and early identification processes for young children. Lisa is part of the INCH Lab team working on the Early Developmental Screening initiative to identify young children with potential developmental delay.