Students

 


Chloe Bedard is a second year MSc student in the Health Research Methodology Program at McMaster University. She has a Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours) degree and a minor in psychology from McMaster University. Her main area of interest is on mental health across the lifespan, with a particular focus on children. Her research involves interventions aimed to improve both motor coordination and psychosocial skills in young children, both with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Emily Bremer is a second year PhD student in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University. She completed her BHSc (Honours) and MHSc in Kinesiology at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on the impact of fundamental motor skills on physical activity and overall health in children with and without developmental disabilities.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Yao-Chuen Li is a third year PhD student in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University under the supervision of Dr. John Cairney. He was also a pediatric physical therapist in Taiwan. He graduated from China Medical University with a B.Sc. degree in Physical Therapy in 2005, and with a M.Sc. degree in Medical Science under the supervision of Dr. Sheng K. Wu in 2006. His Master’s thesis focused on establishing reliability and validity of the Taiwanese Movement Assessment Test for Children with age- and gender-matched norms, which could be used to evaluate and diagnose children with motor impairments. He has been involving in research regarding children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) for more than five years. His PhD thesis focuses on the reliability and validity of the evaluation tool used for children with DCD.

 

 

 

 


Sara King-Dowling is a third year PhD student in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University. She graduated with an Honours B.Sc. in Kinesiology, along with a minor in Psychology. Her primary research interests focus on the impact of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) on health related physical fitness and physical activity in the early years. Sara's research is funded by an Ontario Graduate Scholarship.